Composite cardiac binding in experimental heart failure.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Composite cardiac binding consists of wrapping the heart with a synthetic membrane and a pericardial interposition. The goal of the present study was to apply composite cardiac binding to a canine model of heart failure. METHODS Twenty dogs were randomized to 2 groups: untreated heart failure (group 1, n = 13) and heart failure pretreated by composite cardiac binding (group 2, n = 7). They received a total dose of 1 mg x kg(-1) of intracoronary doxorubicin over 4 weeks. Hemodynamic data were obtained at weeks 0, 7, and 12. All animals were followed up with weekly echocardiography for 12 weeks. RESULTS Survival in group 1 was 54% and in group 2 was 100% at week 12 (p = 0.0438). Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure increased by 153% in group 1 and by 59% in group 2 (p = 0.0395) at week 12. Ejection fraction decreased by 27% in group 1 and by 19% in group 2 (p = 0.4401) at week 12. CONCLUSIONS Composite cardiac binding significantly prolongs survival and attenuates left ventricular dilatation and the increase in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure associated to chronic heart failure. Further evaluation in established heart failure is needed. Composite cardiac binding may be used for the prevention of recurrent dilatation following reduction ventriculoplasty.

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